envelope-ofacebook2linkedinsearchtriangle-downTwitter_Logo_White-on-Bluetwitter

Frequently Asked Questions

Browse commonly raised questions about
our K-12 Bridge to Broadband program.

CONTACT US

K-12 Bridge to Broadband is a partnership program between EducationSuperHighway, school districts, states, and Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to connect student households for remote learning.

With data sharing agreements in place, school districts share de-identified student addresses with ISPs using our Data Exchange Platform. ISPs confirm if they currently serve each address or if they can serve each address, resulting in a complete dataset that identifies unconnected student households. The program offers a route to rapidly identify and qualify K-12 household eligibility. Here is how it works:

 

Internet Service Provider FAQs


Why is EducationSuperHighway facilitating the data exchange on behalf of states and districts?
State and school district leaders have weathered the COVID-19 pandemic with greater demands on their time and resources than ever before. We heard from countless states and districts that their attempts to gather student connectivity data through time-intensive calling campaigns and surveys to families were plagued with low participation and data inaccuracy challenges. When K-12 Bridge to Broadband was launched, the unprecedented commitment from ISPs to help identify unconnected students was viewed as a game-changer for providing actionable data to close the digital divide. States and school districts are seeking help from trusted partners like EducationSuperhighway to remove capacity constraints, provide technical and legal expertise and manage the numerous relationships with the ISPs to provide them with this critical data.

How can ISPs participate in the data exchange for state or district projects?
As a prerequisite to participate, ISPs will sign a non-disclosure agreement with EducationSuperHighway and designate a point of contact who can run the exchange. We will provide a standard template that can be reviewed and modified as necessary. The agreement is meant to protect the data supplied by both states/districts and ISPs: student addresses and proprietary information. After ISPs sign the agreement, EducationSuperHighway will schedule time with the point of contact to walk through the data exchange process.

How will EducationSuperHighway format the student address data?
After we receive the student address data from states or districts, EducationSuperHighway undergoes a rigorous process to reformat, validate, and anonymize the data before providing it to ISPs with the following elements:

  • Address ID (internally created by EducationSuperHighway, not the actual Student ID)
  • Student Address (broken out into elements)
  • Latitude and longitude coordinates
  • Provider Name FCC Registration Number (FRN)

Note that EducationSuperHighway will only provide the student addresses that overlap with each company’s covered territory as designated in FCC Form 477 data.


How will ISPs access and return the student address data?
ISPs will use the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Client to download and return data in a CSV format. For each ISP, EducationSuperHighway will create a unique account with AWS Access Keys. The ISP will download and install the AWS Client. The ISP will use the AWS Access Keys and the AWS Client to download and return the CSV data.

What specific data is requested from ISPs to complete the exchange?
For each student address, ISPs will designate one of the following codes to indicate subscriber information and service availability:

  • 0 = No service available at this address
  • 1 = Service available at this address with existing  infrastructure but not active
  • 2 = Service currently active at this address

Active is defined as currently connected. ISPs should not include subscribers that are currently disconnected due to delinquent account billing status.


Will the data exchange be a one-time exercise, or will it be repeated?
At a minimum, the data exchange process will be required up-front before states or districts can engage in procurement. Following the initial exchange, data exchanges are likely to be repeated annually to keep pace with family enrollment and adoption. Ultimately, the state or district will decide the cadence of ongoing exchanges.

How will states or districts fund broadband procurements on behalf of families?
States or districts have used a combination of federal and state funding and private philanthropy to fund projects to connect student households. View a summary of federal funding available for K-12 home connectivity here, including $7.2 billion added to E-rate for home connectivity purchases and $130 billion for K-12 schools through the American Rescue Plan.

State and School District FAQs


Why is EducationSuperHighway facilitating the data exchange on behalf of states and districts?
State and school district leaders have weathered the COVID-19 pandemic with greater demands on their time and resources than ever before. We heard from countless states and districts that their attempts to gather student connectivity data through time-intensive calling campaigns and surveys to families were plagued with low participation and data inaccuracy challenges. When K-12 Bridge to Broadband was launched, the unprecedented commitment from ISPs to help identify unconnected students was viewed as a game-changer for providing actionable data to close the digital divide. States and school districts are seeking help from trusted partners like EducationSuperhighway to remove capacity constraints, provide technical and legal expertise and manage the numerous relationships with the ISPs to provide them with this critical data.

Which Internet Service Providers will participate in the data exchange?
EducationSuperHighway has secured a commitment from 90 Internet Service Providers that represent 90% of coverage in the country to participate in the K-12 Bridge to Broadband program. Participating providers are listed here.

If there are local or regional service providers in your area that have not yet committed to the program, EducationSuperHighway’s program team will work with you to get an agreement in place and engage them in the data exchange.


Which Internet Service Providers will participate in the data exchange?
States and school districts share de-identified household address data with EducationSuperHighway. If states are sharing data on behalf of school districts, they will also include a field for the district NCES code. Specifically, the data fields required are:

  • Primary ID (NOT the Student ID, just a primary key for internal matching)
  • Street Address
  • Unit
  • City
  • State
  • Zip Code
  • District NCES Code (States only)

What specific data is requested from ISPs to complete the exchange?
For each student address, ISPs will designate one of the following codes to indicate subscriber information and service availability:

  • 0 = No service available at this address
  • 1 = Service available at this address with existing  infrastructure but not active
  • 2 = Service currently active at this address

Active is defined as currently connected. ISPs should not include subscribers that are currently disconnected due to delinquent account billing status.


How long does the program typically take to execute?
The program execution timeline varies for each project. Key dependencies are typically (1) time to execute a data-sharing agreement between EducationSuperHighway and the state or school district, (2) time to execute agreements with all relevant service providers, and (3) time for service providers to respond with the requested subscriber and serviceability data. Once agreements are in place with all parties, we typically expect the exchange to be completed within a matter of weeks.

Will the data exchange be a one-time exercise, or will it be repeated?
At a minimum, the data exchange process will be required up-front before states or districts can engage in procurement. Following the initial exchange, data exchanges are likely to be repeated annually to keep pace with family enrollment and adoption. Ultimately, the state or district will decide the cadence of ongoing exchanges.

What outputs will I receive when the data exchange is complete?
As a result of the data exchange, states and school districts will receive three outputs: (1) raw data in CSV format that indicates which addresses are connected and for those that are unconnected, the providers that can serve those households, (2) a map that visualizes unconnected households and provider coverage, and (3) a dashboard view that captures the results of the data exchange.

Is there a cost to participating in the K-12 Bridge to Broadband program?
No. As a non-profit organization, EducationSuperHighway provides support to all state, district, and service provider partners at no cost.

How can I participate in or find out more about the K-12 Bridge to Broadband program?
Please use this link to reach out to the EducationSuperHighway team to get started.

Want to learn more?

Our team is here to connect states, school districts, and Internet Service Providers. Together we are working to close the homework gap and bridge the digital divide.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.